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Office Signs

Office Signs provide several important functions. Three of the most important are:

  1. Provide Information. What?
  2. Provide direction. Where?
  3. Tell the story. Who?

So how do you decide what your office signs should look like?  Three considerations are Color,Contrast and legibility. According to Color Combo.com, people are affected psychologically by color.  Therefore, it’s best for business owners keep this in mind when choosing Office Signs.  Warm colors are relaxing and may help customers “feel at home” and be comfortable.  Good choices are soft reds, oranges, gold’s…  A vibrant red or bright yellow sign will arouse the senses and give your visitors a sense of energy.  Whereas cool colors are attention getters – think hot pink or neon green.

Businesses should decide what response they want when choosing colors for signs.  Here are a few examples of businesses that use signage that illustrates this:

  • McDonald’s – yellow is a happy color.
  • Macy’s – red is stimulating color.
  • Capital One – blue is a trustworthy color.
  • Toys R Us – primary colors are fun.

If your business already has a color scheme or logo, you can work to carry out those colors throughout the signage.  Black and white signage is always a good basic choice.  It has good contrast, is legible and cost effective. Studies show that one or two colors is best, three may work, but more than that may get confusing.

Just as important as the color choice is the amount of contrast in your business sign.  The more contrast, the better.  For example a black and white sign creates high contrast, whereas a navy blue and black sign  creates low contrast.  Offset and dimensional signs offer contrast and interest.  Interestingly, the background color of a sign can be light or dark, as long as the foreground contrasts.  Some colors are considered more feminine or masculine as with pink and blue.  Orange evokes positivity and joy.  In today’s environmentally conscious society, green is thought of as a healthier color.

The ability to read a sign, legibility, is also important. Keep the size of the sign and lettering in mind.  Will the sign be read from a far distance?  The American Disabilities Act can give some guidance on sign size, lettering, and approved font choices.  Rely on your sign supplier to help you with these requirements.

If your business already has a color scheme or logo, you can work to carry out those colors throughout the signage.  Black and white signage is always a good basic choice.  It has good contrast, is legible and cost effective. Studies show that one or two colors is best, three may work, but more than that may get confusing.   It is also best to keep to basic fonts.  Fancy fonts can be difficult to read.

See more ideas.